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PostPosted: 11/07/18 2:35 pm • # 1 
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Jeff Sessions lasted longer than I thought he would ~ the BIG question now is ... WHO WILL BE NEXT? ~ :ey ~ Sooz

Attorney General Jeff Sessions resigns at Trump’s request
The Washington Post / Devlin Barrett / 20 mins ago

Attorney General Jeff Sessions resigned on Wednesday at President Trump’s request, ending the tenure of a loyalist he soured on shortly after Sessions took office in 2017 because the former senator from Alabama had recused himself from oversight of the investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential campaign.

Despite the tension with the White House, Sessions had described the position of top law enforcement officer as his dream job and he pursued his conservative agenda with gusto. But he also had to live with sometimes humiliating attacks from a president he couldn’t seem to please and the suspicions of career staff members who feared the politicization of a Justice Department that prides itself on its independence.

Department veterans have expressed concerns that Trump’s repeated public attacks on Sessions, the Justice Department and the FBI could cause lasting damage to federal law enforcement.

Sessions, 71, was the first U.S. senator to endorse Trump, and in many ways he had been the biggest supporter of the president’s policies on immigration, crime and law enforcement.

But all of those areas of agreement were overshadowed by the Russia investigation — specifically, Sessions’s recusal from the inquiry after it was revealed that he had met more than once with the Russian ambassador to the United States during the 2016 campaign even though he had said during his confirmation hearing that he had not met with any Russians.

Trump has never forgiven Sessions for that decision, which he regarded as an act of disloyalty that denied him the protection he thought he deserved from his attorney general. “I don’t have an attorney general,” he said in September.

Privately, Trump has derided Sessions as “Mr. Magoo,” a cartoon character who is elderly, myopic and bumbling, according to people with whom he has spoken.

Trump also had repeatedly threatened or demanded Sessions’s ouster behind closed doors, only to be convinced by aides that removing him could provoke a political crisis within the Republican Party, where many conservatives stayed loyal to the former senator. In recent months, however, some of those allies had signaled a willingness to tolerate Sessions’s removal after the midterm election.

Democrats have moved gingerly around Sessions — fearful that if he were driven from office, his replacement could curtail the Russia investigation led by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III.

A person close to Sessions, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to be frank, said the attorney general shared the president’s frustration with the pace of the Russia inquiry, and wished that it had been completed. But Sessions also thought that by staying in the job, he had protected the integrity of the investigation, the person said. In the long run, Sessions is convinced that the country will be better served by the investigation proceeding naturally, as the findings will be more credible to the American public, the person said.

Mueller is looking into Trump’s statements seeking to fire Sessions or force his resignation n an effort to determine whether those acts are part of a pattern of attempted obstruction of justice, according to people close to the investigation.

Earlier this year, Mueller’s team questioned witnesses about Trump’s private comments and state of mind in late July and early August of last year, around the time he belittled his “beleaguered” attorney general on Twitter, these people said. The questions sought to determine whether the president’s goal was to oust Sessions so he could replace him with someone who would take control of the investigation, these people said.

The Mueller inquiry is overseen by Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein, who also has had strained relations with Trump, but is considered safe in his position for the moment.

Sessions usually does not respond to the president’s criticism, but he has at times pushed back.

After one particularly blistering tweet in February, in which the president said Sessions’s actions were “DISGRACEFUL!” he issued a statement: “As long as I am the Attorney General, I will continue to discharge my duties with integrity and honor, and this Department will continue to do its work in a fair and impartial manner according to the law and Constitution.’’

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/attorney-general-jeff-sessions-resigns-at-trump%e2%80%99s-request/ar-BBPsjBH?li=BBnb7Kz


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PostPosted: 11/07/18 5:06 pm • # 2 
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Matt Whitaker is named, I believe temporarily, but that may just be a formality. This does not bode well for the Mueller investigation, at all. Trump is running scared now that he lost the house, but that is when he is at his worst - he digs in and no telling what conniving he will do and get away with. The dems on a high right now better dig in themselves and figure out a way to stop him.

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/ma ... 4388931ca2


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PostPosted: 11/07/18 6:17 pm • # 3 
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Karolinablue wrote:
Matt Whitaker is named, I believe temporarily, but that may just be a formality. This does not bode well for the Mueller investigation, at all. Trump is running scared now that he lost the house, but that is when he is at his worst - he digs in and no telling what conniving he will do and get away with. The dems on a high right now better dig in themselves and figure out a way to stop him.

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/ma ... 4388931ca2


The Republicans nearly always figure out a way to outwit the Dems. The Dems need people as ruthless as the Repubs are. Unfortunately that is the current state of the US, IMO.


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PostPosted: 11/07/18 6:51 pm • # 4 
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With Sessions out and Grabem basically in control of Mueller's investigation, can Congress protect Mueller. For example, when Trump or his puppet move to fire or restrict Mueller, can Congress simply put him under their wing?


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PostPosted: 11/07/18 7:00 pm • # 5 
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They wont fire him, they'll gut him with a budget cut (to virtually zero) and then when he does submit the report they'll try and censor it or hide it or both.

But I suspect one or other of the committees could subpoena it.


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PostPosted: 11/07/18 7:11 pm • # 6 
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Error - Sessions timed out.


Either that or Santa has put out a call for Elves.


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PostPosted: 11/07/18 7:13 pm • # 7 
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Cattleman wrote:
They wont fire him, they'll gut him with a budget cut (to virtually zero) and then when he does submit the report they'll try and censor it or hide it or both.

But I suspect one or other of the committees could subpoena it.



I thought Congress controlled the budget.


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PostPosted: 11/07/18 9:30 pm • # 8 
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I don't think they can micro manage it within departments.


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PostPosted: 11/08/18 5:58 am • # 9 
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jimwilliam wrote:
With Sessions out and Grabem basically in control of Mueller's investigation, can Congress protect Mueller. For example, when Trump or his puppet move to fire or restrict Mueller, can Congress simply put him under their wing?

The "new" Congress doesn't take office immediately. Trump has a window of opportunity to act unimpeded.


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PostPosted: 11/08/18 10:01 am • # 10 
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shiftless2 wrote:
jimwilliam wrote:
With Sessions out and Grabem basically in control of Mueller's investigation, can Congress protect Mueller. For example, when Trump or his puppet move to fire or restrict Mueller, can Congress simply put him under their wing?

The "new" Congress doesn't take office immediately. Trump has a window of opportunity to act unimpeded.


That's true, there won't be a change until January. In the meantime, and with nothing to lose the Republicans, lacking both morals and ethics, could do a lot of damage. Still, when they do get in the Dems should be able to undo much of whatever they do. In other words - go all Trumpian on the Repubs.


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PostPosted: 11/08/18 10:04 am • # 11 
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Seems there are two main types of Republicans left: Trumplicans and cowards.


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PostPosted: 11/08/18 2:21 pm • # 12 
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Moderate Republicans are caught in a kind of double bind Oskar.

Trump pretty much controls a significant proportion of the Republican vote - the hard right - and if you don't openly support him then that support can be withheld, and that means you have a far greater chance of losing the next election and/or primaries.

He's effectively purging the moderates …..


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PostPosted: 11/08/18 3:48 pm • # 13 
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Cattleman wrote:
Moderate Republicans are caught in a kind of double bind Oskar.

Trump pretty much controls a significant proportion of the Republican vote - the hard right - and if you don't openly support him then that support can be withheld, and that means you have a far greater chance of losing the next election and/or primaries.

He's effectively purging the moderates …..


I guess all those moderates who simply quit rather than challenge the Trumplicans would go in the "coward" category, then. IMO, whatever happens can be laid right at their doorstep along with those who don't bother voting.


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PostPosted: 11/08/18 7:26 pm • # 14 
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Never forget that a politician's first duty is to be reelected. :(


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PostPosted: 11/09/18 6:52 am • # 15 
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Yep.

Most of those moderates who had challenged Trump, or even rejected his help, lost in the election.

They didn't quit, but without the support of the virulent pro-Trump supporters they couldn't win.

Now, that might be a long-term road to destruction, but in the short term it can be, and will be, seen as a boost for the Con-man in Chief.


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PostPosted: 11/09/18 10:49 am • # 16 
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Quote:
They didn't quit,...


I beg to differ but a good number of them did quit.


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